agile global project management, international trade,
This week I caught up top global IT project manager, Sean Hull. Sean leads global teams on enterprise system implementations. His latest project involved a U.S.-American company implementing a customized system for an Australian customer that was developed by a South Korean team. I wanted to hear Sean’s insights about how agile management practices are used in global project implementations.

Like Sean, I have spent much of my career in and around large-scale technology industries. I know that any company selling enterprise-level customized software or other technologies needs a high-performance professional implementation services team – the company’s competitive edge.

I recently worked with a tech company that did not yet have such a team. Projects lost money instead of providing much-needed profit margins. Fulfilling the contract meant commandeering product development resources away from core product (that was already late to market) in order to write custom code. It was a first-class mess. Any improvements to project management methods literally hit the bottom line for the company.

“Software is worthless until it is used by a customer.” ~ Sean Hull

Sean went on to say that, “in Agile Project Management, software is delivered in iterative code and documentation. Feedback from the customer is built into short “sprint” cycles. This requires vendor and customer staff to have instant contact. Tight delivery cycles and collaborative communications need to be exceptionally managed for all of this to be successful. One of the benefits of agile project management is that the customer helps to discover any issues much earlier in the implementation process. This saves time and resources overall.”

 

Here are some of Sean’s tips for effective global project management:

Tip 1: Enforce your project management processes and tools. A project manager can choose from any number of processes and online tools to manage the project. Enforcing that nothing happens on the project unless it is communicated and documented according to the project rules is especially critical when the team is spread out geographically. One of Sean’s favorite project collaboration tools is Basecamp, which scales from small to very large projects.

Tip 2: Get to know your team. Meet in person, if you can, even if that means traveling to the same location. Be sure to draw up a process that would work for all involved. It is extremely helpful to know how your team members currently approach their work. Together with his team Sean likes to define: “What does the baked pizza look like?” It’s also a great idea to look for ways to make life easier for all involved.

Tip 3: Know how to collaborate with all cultures involved. In some cultures, the boss tells his or her team exactly what to do. In others, team members are expected to take more initiative and share their expertise openly within the team. Incorporate the various styles into how you work with your team. Sean recommends using the SCARF Model.

Tip: 4: Take advantage of the tactical tools from Agile methodologies. This includes how to run meetings, monitoring progress, etc. These work well as long as you take into the variation needed for culture and personality.

As global project management competency grows as a critical factor for business success, these skills will be critical to securing profit margins and loyal customers. I hope you find these tips useful in your company and projects.

For more information about how to expand your company internationally, please contact me for a 30-minute complimentary consultation.

Becky DeStigter

The International Entrepreneur