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The International Entrepreneur – How to Respond to International Business Opportunities Outside Current Markets

Business Opportunities in New Countries

 

Michelle looked up from her computer monitors and directly at her business partner, Brian.

?Japan? Do we even know anyone in Japan? How did they find out about our company??, asked Michelle.

Only 9 months ago, Michelle and Brian had launched their software startup. Things were going better than they ever dreamed it would. They were right about the need for their product in the market and the company was now hurdling forward at rapid pace – doubling size roughly every month. It was all that Michelle and Brian could do to keep up with the growth.

There had been some sales in Canada and then Ireland, but Japan? That meant non-English clients and many more unknowns. This would be a large client, but was it the right time to expand to a market not yet covered?

 

How do you respond to a sales lead in a market you do not yet know?

As with most international business questions, the answer is? it depends.

Companies that seek out products and services not yet offered in their country are normally seeking competitive advantage that they hope your product or service will provide. This is also true for distributors wanting to represent your product in a new market. They often want your product as is with little or no negotiated concessions, no trips to their country for sales presentations or other costly outlays. They are willing to pay in your currency and sign your contract terms. That?s probably how Michelle and Brian so quickly sold product to new customers in Canada and Ireland.

There are clear business risks for selling products to clients in markets where your company has no presence. Entrepreneurs need to watch for risks, including these:

  1. Intellectual Property Protections. For anyone relying on newly developed technology or a brand with growing market recognition, protecting your IP is paramount to long-term success. Trademarks, copyrights and patents can still be infringed upon, but at least if they are internationally registered you have the means to legally defend them. Once the damage has been done, it?s too late to register and try to recoup any losses.
  2. Compliance with Regulations. Sure, you can sell products or services into a country. But that does not mean that it was done in compliance with local, national and regional laws. International trade is governed by trade agreements, your own country?s laws, as well as the rules governing your customer?s location. Rules may govern your product?s packaging, tariffs, import restrictions, computer server locations, etc. This is an area where arming yourself with knowledge is smarter than learning through fines, penalties and bans.
  3. Logistics and Support. For products that need to be transported or assembled to the overseas location, logistics can be a costly part of the sale. Once a market is established, often shipping costs can be reduced with larger volumes and long-term contracts. But for early sales, be sure to fully understand logistics costs and build them into your price quotes. For Michelle and Brian looking at Japan, they need to consider how will they support their product with this customer? Will time difference be a challenge? Language? Discuss these issues up front so that there are no misunderstandings.

There are more risks, but this is a list of some of the most critical early considerations.

Entrepreneurs tend to approach their early international sales opportunities in one of three ways:

  1. Throw Caution to the Wind. This is a very common approach for young companies. The pressure to quickly show top-line company growth outweighs the perceived risks. Michelle and Brian assumed that all would be fine in selling to Canada and Ireland without checking for any issues. Normally this subsides around the same time as the first foreign fines are levied or IP piracy surfaces.
  2. Stall the Sale & Do Your Homework. This is a smart approach IF the sale?s margin is larger than the cost to pay for any in-country trademark registrations and to check for any cross-border regulatory issue. TIP: check your own country?s exporting resources first because they are often free or nearly free. Arming your company with knowledge also prepares the company for its impending growth into new markets. If further international expansion is imminent for Michelle and Brian?s company, this may be the best approach.
  3. Stick Your Head in the Sand. Ignorance can sometimes be bliss? if you need focus on a critical path to success that has no room for deviation. International can be a catalyst for intense revenue growth. But if your staff is tiny and your product development list is large, you may not have the bandwidth to research Japan or any other remotely located opportunity until your company grows larger. It?s not ideal, but sometimes it?s temporarily the smart choice. Since Michelle and Brian seem to have a market-ready product with traction in their home market, they should try to learn all they can about how to intelligently move forward into new markets.

No matter which approach a company takes to leads from new markets, it is important to start learning about where to find new high-growth markets overseas, how to enter those markets, and how to stay steps ahead of the competition.

Good luck to you in all of your international business efforts!

Becky DeStigter

 

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The International Entrepreneur – 5 Tips to Motivate Global Telecommuting Workers

International Entrepreneur - Tips to Motivate Global Telecommuting Workers

 

Sam checked the time on his phone – 5:00am. As he sipped his coffee, Sam prepared for his phone call with Chloe in Ireland, his EMEA Regional Director. Since his software company had expanded globally last year, Sam was needing to manage new employees in new markets.

Sam?s problem was that he never felt like he could trust these new workers like he could his on-site staff. Sam had tried to solve this by implementing a detailed reporting process. That way, he would know exactly what Chloe and her counterpart in Hong Kong, Yang ?Oliver? Jun, were doing with their time. He also invited them to daily leadership conference calls, which they both regularly attended.

Sam wanted these foreign employees to feel included as part of the team, even though meetings were well outside of regular business hours. Sam felt the bristled tone as he and Chloe exchanged greetings. But how could Sam motivate his global remote-based workers to the productivity levels of his home office staff?

 

The Promise & Perils of Global Remote Employees

International employees in remote offices around the world present interesting opportunities and challenges. Companies are realizing that they can access a much larger talent pool when they offer telecommuting positions. And when expanding into new international markets, remote-based staff can be incrementally added based on a growing understanding of a new market?s potential for market access, supplier access, capital access, etc.

As Sam is discovering, managing from afar is not as simple as it appears. A leader does not have the same level of access to their staff. Throw in a half dozen time zones to cross and timing becomes an additional hurdle to online collaboration and supervision. The trick is to focus productivity and performance outcomes. With that in mind, here are:

 

5 Tips for motivating your global workers:

1. ?Set Clear Expectations and Stretch Goals. This is particularly critical for global employees because local business rules and culture are always different than at the home office. For instance, American companies have to set strongly worded company policies that comply with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), else American company offices could face harsh penalties and criminal charges in the United States.

Setting quantifiable goals for all staff takes the focus off of the ?how? things are done and instead focuses on ?what? needs to be accomplished. In other words, build whatever type of boat you want, but sail to Port A by Tuesday.

2. Hire employees overseas with a successful telecommuting track record. Add it to the job requirements and to the interview questions for candidates. Working remotely takes self discipline and independence. Not everyone is meant for this work environment.

3. Conference Calls and Complicated Reporting do not increase engagement, only resentment. Conference calls take away people?s ability to read non-verbal communication signals. When navigating between work cultures, these signals give international staff instantaneous feedback so that they can make real-time adjustments to communications. Without that, remote staff are flying in the blind and likely frustrated.

Reporting can be a helpful management tool. But more reporting rarely improves results. One EMEA Regional Director complained to me that he spent every Friday just creating the complex reports for his American home office. The extra reporting not only reduced his productivity, but his motivation as well.

4. Face-to-Face Video Conferencing builds trust and fosters problem solving. Time and again, a 1:1 video conversation with an employee is the best forum for asking and answering questions, setting expectations and reacting to updates – both positive and negative. To make the most of video time, send updates ahead of time for staff to read and digest the information. Regularly scheduled video calls?several times per week are best when it?s practical.

5. Don?t set your foreign employees up as independent contractors. Most countries do not allow employees to work separately as contractors because it circumvents local labor laws and employer taxation. Imagine what it would feel like when your company?s first request of you is to do something illegal on their behalf. Instead, either register an in-country subsidiary or hire them through Global Employment Outsourcing (GEO).

 

Back to Sam, our software company CEO and his new Asian and European Directors? he needs to call back Chloe as a video call to allow for face-to-face dialog. This will help him build greater rapport. Sam can ask questions about her progress on building her region for the company, as well as how it?s going working remotely. By asking the right questions, now much of the extra reporting can be eliminated, adding to Chloe and Oliver?s productivity. By receiving the review of yesterday?s management meeting, Chloe had time to think about how decisions would affect her region and was able to formulate better questions for Sam. Now both Sam and Chloe felt like their conversation had moved issues forward and improved their working relationship.

In time, a successful director will need to add local staff in an overseas market. But these first few employees are critical to long-term overseas growth. Their engagement needs to be a leadership priority.

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The International Entrepreneur – What?s Missing Globally in the ?Connection Economy?

International Entrepreneur Global Connection Economy

A few years ago, Seth Godin famously introduced the ?Connection Economy? into our lexicon to describe how connecting people, companies and resources was a source of increasing value creation in our world.

Since you?re reading this article, that means that you are part of this global technology revolution and probably interact with it frequently. Here are just a few of my own examples of engaging this Connection Economy from this past week:

  • I collaborated via email with my client?s Malaysian country manager to reach her target leads using calls, emails and social media.
  • I took a call from a company in New York looking for a Uruguayan business culture expert. They found my website through Google. I referred them to a Uruguayan contact whom I have never met face to face, but regularly network with in social media.
  • I Skyped to mentor a Canadian rising star in the international marketing field, who is building a consulting practice.

On a personal level:

  • I sent my teenage son, Nathan on a foreign exchange with AFS Intercultural Programs. That means that he will stay with a host family in Italy for 5 weeks whom we have never met before, but were vetted locally by AFS.
  • My Brazilian exchange student, Matheus came home safely from a gathering with friends via a ride from an Uber driver.
  • I took a few daydreaming moments and surfed AirBNB for a nice house rental near the beach in San Diego for Labor Day Weekend in September.

 

When Seth Godin originally described the Connection Economy, he said that it required four pillars:

  1. Coordination. This may be coordinating between people as in the case of Uber. It could coordinate the exchange of money as is the case of crowdfunding. And often it?s the coordination and exchange of information.
  2. Trust. The parties involved need to have a reason to trust each other. Trust is normally built on a foundation of consistent words and actions by people and companies. Now we are trusting partners and vendors whom we may have never actually met before in person.
  3. Permission. In the Connection Economy we voluntarily surrender our information, but only after trust is established.
  4. Exchange of Ideas. This blog (and everyone else?s blog) are part of that exchange of ideas. So is a review site that tells me what current and past employees think about working for a company I?m considering as a partner.

 

Without these pillars, companies like Amazon, Google, Facebook, and countless other Connection companies including my own would not exist. But let?s get out of the American-only point of view and expand to…

 

Bringing a Global Context into the Connection Economy

This may seem confusing to some. After all, isn?t the Connection Economy by its very nature borderless, allowing for seamless access to markets and resources from anywhere in the world? Ideally – yes, but in reality – no. Here?s some context:

 

Access to Connectivity is Far from Universal

As Mark Zuckerberg will tell you, there are 4 billion people in the world with no access to the Internet. 4 billion is roughly half of all people on the planet. There are some sizable barriers to improving access to conduits of information and opportunities that include education, disposable income to buy the necessary tools and services, and even interest.

 

Language and Culture Create Information Silos

The Connection Economy had the perfect solution to bridging language gaps and reaching new markets: Google Translate and other translation widgets that could quickly convert English content effortlessly into dozens of other languages. How clever! Those who tried it soon learned that language is much more nuanced and complex than first thought. Literal translations yield some major mistakes that have cost companies dearly.

Culture is even more complicated. It underpins what determines whether a company or person is worthy of Pillar #2: Trust. Cultural rules run deep and when someone unwittingly violates these rules, the business relationship might never resume. Think of it another way? for all of the interactions you have had over the years with international contacts where you thought the other side was being unreasonable and disagreeable – 90%+ of those negative reactions were probably cultural misunderstandings. The solution is to hire a culture coach to help navigate the norms in key markets and relationships.

 

Regulations Often Protect Entrenched and Local Interests

The Connection Economy has displaced more than a few cab drivers and telephone book printers. It has upended whole industries. In many places around the globe, those who profit from keep things as they are have invested in supporting laws that protect their interests. Before doing business in a new country, be sure to consult with country specialists who can advise you of any problematic restrictions.

 

Expect the Next Great Connecting Concepts to Come from Anywhere in the World

While we tend to see many Connection companies rise out of industry clusters like Silicon Valley, London, Boston, Santiago, Mumbai and Tel Aviv, ideas can come from anywhere. As part of the exchange of ideas, we need to encourage and support new startups with great concepts with our patronage and investment capital – regardless of location.

 

As the beneficiaries of the Connection Economy, it?s important to keep in mind that there is no global standard. We need to increase overall access to the Internet worldwide, providing new opportunities to billions of people. it?s important not to mistake your home market?s perspective, language and cultural rules as the world?s norm. Be prepared for reactions to change in various corners of the world. And watch for the next great advancements in our technology revolution.

Onward & upward

Becky DeStigter
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The International Entrepreneur – Trump and other Branding Issues in International Business

 

International Entrepreneur, Branding Issues in International Business

Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom, President Barack Obama, Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, Jos? Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, and others watch the overtime shootout of the Chelsea vs. Bayern Munich Champions League final (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

I was waiting on the platform for the train from Bedford to London Heathrow. It was October 2004 and I struck up a conversation with a local businessman (staying true to my American stereotype of perpetual friendliness). After a few minutes, the gentleman asked me what was really on his mind?

?What could Americans be thinking to not only have elected President George W. Bush once, but to be poised to reelect him for a second term?? To most Brits, it seemed? well? ridiculous.

I remember standing on the platform trying to explain how our media had splintered into audience segments where an American could hear and read literally only the point of view that they already held. That the United States was politically split in half – sometimes leaving friends or family members on the other side of the opinion divide. My new British acquaintance seemed generally satisfied with that answer. But I was left to ponder about the effect that my country?s leader was having on American business in overseas markets.

Four years later I was in Beijing and was surprised by the adulation Chinese openly felt for Barack Obama. I see the same widespread enthusiasm for leaders like Canadian PM, Justin Trudeau and Pope Francis. It?s the type of branding that helps to open doors to new diplomatic relationships and in the case of the pope, new ideas.

This country ?branding? issue/opportunity is not universal. Larger?countries garner more regional and ?international attention than their smaller neighbors. Every country has local and regional issues whether they be fishing rights or an upcoming presidential election. As Americans traveling internationally, we notice that our presidential elections receive press coverage literally all over the world. When a candidate like Donald Trump says something controversial meant to keep him as the top news story in the U.S., it is heard around the world and interpreted in many ways.

 

If all of this sounds like a distraction to most international business – it is.

 

Most of us avoid talking about politics, religion, and certainly any hot button issues when doing business abroad. We want to achieve our business goals. And alienating potential clients or partners with strongly-held contrary opinions is a recipe for disaster on any continent.

 

Here is advice on how to manage country branding in business:

  1. Most important: Do no harm. Don?t bring up controversial topics that need not be breached. No conversations about the refugee crisis with Europeans. No conversations with Brazilians about their recession. No AIDS talks with Africans. The list goes on, but this is where controversy stays in personal conversations rather than in business talks.
  2. Don?t take offense where none was intended. The temptation to react to statements about your country?s leaders or issues is understandable. It?s much more personal to a German to talk about Angela Merkel than for me to bring her up into conversation. Your German counterparts likely had a vote for or against her party?s election. When you would normally react, stop and first gauge the intention of the offender.
  3. Ask about the filters that color someone?s opinion. When an entire business dinner in Jordan stops talking and eating to hear your opinion of gun violence in the U.S., you can answer with the universal truth – it?s complicated. Then immediately start asking questions to learn what your fellow guests have heard and what they think about the issue. This will help you to carefully frame your answers to stay true to yourself and diplomatic to your fellow guests. If this sounds like too much hassle compared with a direct answer, remember that media, culture and personal experiences frame all of our perspectives. Do I know what a Jordanian thinks about this issue? Not until I ask.
  4. Always learn a country?s basic information before travel and doing business. This includes the country?s leader, their economic and social top?topics and hot button issues. This takes the pressure off of your own country?s branding (if it?s negative) because you can ask questions about topics that your hosts should appreciate. It also is a signal that you have a basic respect for places where you do business (for more on showing local respect, please read my articles on Respect and also Social Corporate Responsibility).
  5. Pull the conversation back to how the subject impacts business and trade. As business professionals, this is usually a common area and one with less friction. And most leaders and topics can usually be tied back to it. For example, ?Are new immigrants helping the U.S.? Immigrants?represent a greater number of working adults in our economy. Most are bilingual with the capability to serve multiple markets. While there are adjustment issues, the U.S. has always absorbed immigrant populations successfully. So I would answer yes.? It?s a business answer to a question that has social, political and cultural implications. If the topic is a tricky one, then this business focused answer is a helpful bridge into another business topic that furthers building the business relationship.

 

No matter your political, cultural, social or economic views, managing key conversations helps further your international business dealings. Remember to (1) do no harm, (2) avoid taking offense, (3) ask for others? opinions to understand their perspective, (4) know a country?s basic information and (5) pull conversations back to business topics as needed.

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The International Entrepreneur – International Trade 2016 Twitter List!

International Trade Experts on Twitter 2016

It’s been 6+ years sharing and trading advice on international trade from those involved on the ground.?We have held weekly conversation on #GlobalBizTalk.

For 2016, here are my recommended Twitter Follows in the field of International Business:

@HoeferleChristian Hoeferle is an international business consultant and cross-cultural expert. Currently based?in Tennessee, he hails from southern Germany. Definitely read his blog, The Culture Mastery.

@edbmarsh ? Best B2B international marketing & sales expert I?ve found, Ed Marsh is a prolific writer on a variety of international business topics. His blog at Consilium Global Business Advisors is a must read.

@DavidMarkNoah ? David Noah is the founder of Intermart, Inc. which makes export management software. David has collected a strong set of blogging experts on his site, Shipping Solutions. Definitely worth?combing through for content. Some of the best articles are in areas of international logistics and finance.

@jht4x4?? John Treleaven is a former Canadian ambassador turned international business consultant, currently based in the Vancouver area. He is highly opinionated on international trade policies but I rarely ever think he?s wrong.

@shull? – Sean Hull is a senior level IT project manager who has led multinational projects around the world. When not on international assignment, he can normally be found in either Washington DC or Columbus, Ohio.

@uklatinamerica?? Gabriela Castro-Fontuora?has lived in the UK and is currently based in her native Uruguay. She is a great resource for anyone needing market research or marketing campaigns focused on Latin America or Europe. Gaby also writes extensively on international marketing and Latin American markets on her blog: SunnySkySolutions.

@introcasoEmiliano Introcaso is the National Program Director for the Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME). This organization puts out a lot of content as webcasts and articles as part of their Export Success Program.

@SandraCravero?? Sandra Cravero is in translation and is based in ?Argentina. Follow her tweets and you’ll know why a great translator is worth their weight in gold.

@dirkhinze Dirk Hinze is a world-class professional international communicator. He is currently based in Lausanne, Switzerland and is a leader in IABC Switzerland.

@VerbaccinoKathrin Bussmann from Toronto is relatively new in international marketing social media circles, but is quickly making a name for herself as a great Twitter and producer of great international marketing podcast interviews on the Verbaccino site.

@LarsLinLars Lin is based in Copenhagen, but has been involved extensively with tech projects around the world.

@NatalyKellyNataly Kelly is the VP of International Operations and Strategy at Boston-based Hubspot. Before Hubspot, Nataly was VP Marketing at Smartling, a translation automation software company.?

@EricSnethkampEric Snethkamp focuses on international payroll and human resources. His background includes international recruitment firms.?He is based in Austin, Texas, USA and develops new strategic partnerships for Safeguard World International.

@arlenemarom ? You’ve heard of Super Connectors: people who seem to know everyone and connect them with the right resources? Arlene Marom is a Super Connector in international trade. She is well connected in her home market of?Israel, as well as in Europe and the U.S. Arlene specializes in helping tech entrepreneurs with marketing. Her blog & company: Tech River.

@FITTNews ? Forum for International Trade Training (FITT) is a forward-leaning non-profit organization based in Ottawa, Canada. FITT also gathers great bloggers to its site. Watch for FITT to continue growing as?the world standard in international trade training & certification. FITT is also hosts a blog of international trade experts from around the world at TradeReady.

@globethoughts??Doug Taylor has been tweeting international business news and insights for years.?He has the pulse of international trade in Canada and abroad.

@MLeitzmannMatthias Leitzmann is the International Channel & Business Development Director for VXi Corporation. He tweets on a variety of international trade, manufacturing and logistics topics.

While I’ve described some of the great international business tweeters, there are many more. Here are more great resources if you’re looking to expand your international business knowledge and contacts:

@3D2B

@AAG_AllamAdvGroup

@albertaguirreca

@AlfonsoDiaz

@AssafLuxembourg

@AzaharaMonllor

@chbrandt

@CreativeEMarket

@crowdmics

@ebodeux

@ExternalExp

@FreightArea

@GlobalTradeData

@How2Go_Consult

@LoueiAli

@mirzazbaig

@MuhichCom

@park_tim

@roxana_escu

@SamSturges1

@SandraStrong

@SH_Intl

@SultanGhaznawi

@UrsulaBrinkman

@vkozacek?

@webport_global

Thank you, Everyone, for your excellent content. Please keep Tweeting!

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The International Entrepreneur – How to Manage International Ignorance in Business

Mexico City ready for international trade

?Marie? has been traveling frequently between clients in Tucson and nearby Phoenix, Arizona, USA. She works with mid-sized expanding technology companies and has for many years around the globe. But Marie confessed to me that lately she is struck by the lack of interest in and understanding of Mexican markets that sit just minutes or hours from a company?s door on the other side of the U.S.-Mexican border. These company leaders seemed locked in a limiting assumption that Mexicans are all poor, uneducated and certainly could not afford American technologies.

For anyone wondering, Mexico is the 15th largest economy in the world as ranked by the IMF, United Nations and World Bank. It?s GDP per Capita is $17,000, which is above the median country by $5,000 (IMF 2014). Every year more Mexican professionals join the workforce in fields like computer science, engineering, and business. And Arizona?s share of this lucrative export market in both B2C and B2B industries is disproportionately low especially considering it?s a state bordering Mexico.

 

Now before any of us should start judging these or any professionals about their world business knowledge, I think it is critical to start with the following truth:

 

We are all operating with an imperfect set of information formed by what we have learned and then understood within the context of our cultural framework.

 

No one can be a true Know-It-All because it is just not possible to learn all that can be learned. Nobody really likes people who act like they Know-It-All, because it?s incredibly annoying. But we can manage ignorance in those we work with and especially in ourselves to the benefit of all. Here are a few key tips:

 

How to Handle Wrong Assumptions in Others

When I last lived abroad, I heard plenty of stereotypes about Americans. We live in skyscrapers. We watch TV all day long. We all wear cowboy hats and boots. And we eat McDonald?s hamburgers every day. These all sound ridiculous and narrow to anyone who has lived in the U.S.. Luckily these stereotypes are all fairly harmless. If you heard someone say that all Dutch people live in windmills or wear wooden shoes, you would probably react with a chuckle. But a word of caution? no one likes to have their limiting assumptions exposed. We all have these assumptions and risk losing face. Here?s how to help others while staying professional:

 

 

  1. Ask Questions About the Assumption

 

? ? ? Instead, consider asking questions around the false assumption.

? ? ??Have you visited the U.S.? Did you see more apartments than houses where you visited??

?????Do we as a company know the size of the Mexican market for our products or industry? Could we find out??

Open-ended questions like these allow the person to rethink their statement and its underlying assumptions. It lets them have the chance to evolve past the assumption based on some new information or additional research. This is particularly important and sensitive when the faulty assumption is coming from your boss, investor, or client.

 

  1. Provide Published Data Supporting the Myth Bust

While some assumptions are trivial, others may be significantly limiting the growth of your company. If there is a chance that you may have a Mexican-size market nearby that is currently underserved, then gathering data and opinions about this opportunity can help to build interest to internal stakeholders.

 

  1. Ask Permission to Take it Further

Once it?s been established that the assumption is false, now there is a brief window of time to reframe understanding around the clearer picture. I like to also change pronouns from ?you? didn?t understand this before to ?we? didn?t understand the implications. But now that we do, we can take full advantage of this new understanding to excel further as a company.

 

Confronting Our Own Limits

To become better global business professionals, we need to constantly be challenging our own limitations. I would encourage you to:

  1. Read magazines, newspapers and other media from a variety of sources that are likely to share contrary points of view. A local newspaper can be supplemented with The Economist Magazine or a translated online version of another country?s main newspaper. Even exposure once a month will quickly show the variety of points of view on a single subject.
  2. Put yourself in new situations where you will meet people from different backgrounds. Travel is a great way to do this. So are local ethnic meetup group events.
  3. When new information challenges your previous assumptions, stop to think through all of the implications. Let your understanding of the world grow just a little bigger in that moment.

 

I think most of us in the field of international trade run into this false assumptions issue much more often than we would like to admit (certainly to our clients and bosses). The goal is to help clients be more globally competitive. That starts with the clearest possible understanding of the global environments in which companies operate.

 

Wishing you success in all of your global markets!

Becky

 

The International Entrepreneur – Tips for Being an International Distributor

Tips for Being an International Distributor

A Kenyan distributor recently wrote to me asking for advice to build an in-country distributor business. He was interested in representing more products in the Kenyan market and wanted to find the right suppliers for his business. That is a great topic especially given both the opportunities associated with reselling globally-branded products and the risks of working with new supplier partners. Here is my advice:

 

Specialize by Client Profile and Seek Related Products

I remember traveling once in Italy and visiting Pisa with its famous vertically-challenged tower. The sky filled with clouds and all at once a heavy shower drenched every tourist in sight, sending everyone running for cover. The nearby Ethiopian entrepreneurs tucked away their packs of postcards just in time and switched to selling umbrellas covered with images of famous Italian sites. I still have my emergency Pisa umbrella purchased that day. These Ethiopians knew their target market: tourists like me. Our changing needs were their new opportunities.

This is true for business-to-business markets as well. All companies look for resources to help them find smart solutions to their challenges. Whether your clients are hospitals, schools, young tech companies or any other profile, learn what they need through conversations in order to identify the types of products you should be representing. If your company wants to expand to serve more diverse sets of clients, consider adding staff or even teams to address this new market rather than spread resources too thin across a disconnected base.

 

Define Your Geography

Distributors normally cover a specific region. In a large country, this may be a handful of states or provinces or even as small as a metropolitan area if the local product demand is high. But in some areas of the world, a distributor may be able to cover a much larger area because clients are located far from each other. In the case of Africa, a distributor with headquarters in Nairobi may hire employees or contractors in neighboring countries like Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania to help him sell products in those countries. But whatever the size of the distributor?s covered territory, it is vitally important that they are able to support sales throughout the whole area with local language, on-site visits, etc.

 

Focus on Business Relationships Over Transactions

As a reseller for an international product, your business depends on both your relationships with both your suppliers in another country as well as the relationships with your clients. Transaction-based sales assume that you do not care if you do business with this client again. Relationship-based selling includes:

  • Building Trust. It takes time to earn a client or supplier?s trust. One of the most important components of trust-building is consistently delivering on what you say you will do.
  • Building Reputation. Your reputation is how others would describe you and your business. Do they see you as someone who delivers product on time? Do you work hard to find new potential clients? Do you contact target accounts regularly to find out their needs? A good reputation always leads to referrals to new suppliers and clients. It is a key long-term investment.
  • Caring about both suppliers and clients? success. Long-term relationships as a distributor and supplier always should focus on how to help your suppliers and clients succeed. If you serve the hospital market, then how do your clients define success? What keeps them from being more successful in your market? Even if you can?t solve a problem like the need for investors, a lack of qualified medical staff or new government health regulations, it shows great concern and understanding to acknowledge challenges they face and to be looking for ways to help them be successful.

 

Find Suppliers You Can Trust Now? and Later

Start on the right footing by carefully choosing companies and products you want to represent. Have a clear explanation about how each supplier and their products fits with the rest of your product offering to your clients.

Build international supplier networks with those you feel you can trust. Even the best product fit must also be met with a trustworthy staff. Does the supplier take time to talk with you? Do the company employees follow through with what they say and do?

Before signing on as a distributor, be sure to check a company?s reputation in both their country and yours. A third party investigator verify. Also, you can ask to talk with other distributors currently working with the company.

 

International distributors is a popular option for growing companies to reach new markets. It is equally beneficial for those companies in the overseas markets wanting to represent new offerings. As a distributor you will want to focus on a specific client profile and geographic region. Focusing on identifying and building business relationships with overseas suppliers is more important than those early sales. Only work with those you can trust!

The International Entrepreneur Interviewed – How to Become an International Entrepreneur w/ Becky DeStigter

Becky DeStigter interview podcast by VerbaccinoReaders,

This week I want to share a great interview and conversation I had with?Kathrin Bussmann, host of The Worldly Marketer Podcast Series. For those of you who don’t know Kathrin yet, she is the Founder of Verbaccino and the Creator of International & Global Marketing Strategies for the Digital Age. Kathrin asked me a variety of questions related to early-stage global business?expansion. I hope you enjoy!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/twm-001-how-to-become-international/id1114738776?i=1000368858535&mt=2

Best wishes,
Becky

The International Entrepreneur – Improving Employee Engagement in Your Global Workforce

Improving Employee Engagement in your Global Workforce

I knew from the way that Pedro in the Mexico City office the phone that something had turned for the worst. Pedro?s voice sounded low and muttled – preoccupied and low energy compared with our recent interactions. Pedro and his colleagues had recently been missing key details in our shared projects. They just seemed? well? disengaged from their tasks. I picked up the phone to call someone I knew from the company?s leadership team.

 

A Pandemic of Disengaged Zombie Workers

Pedro and his colleagues are not the exception. They are unfortunately the norm. Studies by Gallop, Deloitte, Dale Carnegie and others all point to the staggering lack of employee engagement in the United States. These studies all show 70%+ of workers surveyed consider themselves unengaged at work.

As a company breaks through from startup to growth stage, its leaders often discuss how to preserve that ?entrepreneurial culture? – its key success factor.?Translated:

We don?t want to lose that sense of individual employee contribution and drive to beat the odds.

We?re talking about the essence of employee engagement. According to Dale Carnegie Training, U.S. companies with engaged employees outperform non-engaging companies by 202%.

 

Globally The Disengagement Issue Compounds

Most growth-stage companies eventually start taking global markets seriously, opening overseas offices and hiring local staff. Here is where the employee engagement challenges start to compound. A disappointing 13% of international employees feel engaged in their jobs according to Gallup?s State of the Global Workplace.

There are factors to consider to improve global worker engagement, productivity and accountability:

  1. Motivators Vary – Money is often a strong work motivator world wide. If paid what we feel is a fair, market rate for our efforts, then we are likely motivated. But most of us want more than that. We may want opportunities to learn new skills, job stability, and career advancement. Most of us want some work-life balance and a good work environment.
    But beyond that, motivators may be quite different. For instance, in group-oriented cultures where team projects are preferred to individual efforts (Japan). Some cultures expect a relaxed atmosphere (Jamaica) while others want intense work time and a shorter workweek (Germany).
  2. Management Styles Vary – For most Americans, the most energy-draining management style is being closely supervised while also verbally reprimanded in front of peers over seemingly minor mistakes. Yet this is common in India. Indian managers overseeing non-Indian staff learn to modify their style via coaching or negative results. ?Likewise, American managers are not always viewed in the same way as they would be in an American-only environment. Engaged employees normally trust their leaders. Building trust changes based on culture. Know what?s expected.
  3. Language and Communication Styles Vary – ?Are you sitting in your seat??, is a curious question at the onset of my colleague?s international team calls. While an interesting way to ask if everyone is ready, there are other linguistic challenges that cause breaches in trust and motivation. One of the bigger challenges in communications is between indirect and direct?communicators. Direct (ex. Dutch, Israeli) often say what they are thinking and value sincerity. They find indirect communicators annoying. Indirect (ex. Japan, Ghana) typically avoid saying anything embarrassing to themselves or the other party. They value courtesy and respecting others. They find the direct communicators often rude and untrustworthy. Working with those you can?t trust reduces engagement.

 

Who in the Organization Should Fix This Issue?

Disengagement is often a company-wide issue, affecting operations, financials, customer engagement and other key functions. It needs to be discussed at the executive level. The Chief Human Resources Officer (CHRO) has a key role to play in offering solutions in terms of hiring criteria, employee onboarding, cross-cultural communications training and conflict resolution. And finally, local office managers need to be coached on global management skills.

 

How to Increase Employee Engagement Worldwide

All is not lost to office zombies! Here are my ideas to re-engage:

  1. Hire the right people overseas. Even within an overseas market, there is always a wide candidate pool variance. If your company values high energy staff or a connection to your mission or customer focus, then search for that match in international hires too.
  2. Ask the right questions and then listen to the answers. When an office or staff member seems out of alignment with the rest of the company, it?s the time to ask: ?What do you think about…:?? ?Can you see a better way to do??? ?What would help you to feel more engaged in your job?? If it?s possible to fix the situation by conversation, then it saves the company the cost of replacing another employee.
  3. Learn the cultural basics of your global offices. Instead of assuming sameness, find out what the differences are to head off future conflict and energy drains. An easy Internet search will provide basic information on a country?s business culture.
  4. Take input from all locations for company goals and employee reward systems. Part of employee engagement is ownership in the company?s outcomes and processes. Solicit input and credit great ideas from outside of the HQ office.
  5. Explain why decisions are being made and how a decision fits into the long-term strategy. Since business rules change from country to country, it helps to explain that context in which your company leaders make their decisions. Decisions that don?t seem to make sense are a major demotivater.

 

Often executives of growing companies assume that global offices and employees are all from the same home culture. Few international employees will speak up when they feel that internal culture clash for fear of losing their jobs. Instead, disengagement sets in. Instead of accepting zombie employees as an inevitable byproduct of company growth and success, it?s time to use knowledge and communications to engage and inspire throughout your organization.

 

Onward and upward,

Becky DeStigter

 

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The International Entrepreneur – Setting up Your International Distributor Program for Success

international distributor partner representative

 

Your company may use a partner, channel, distributor or representative (rep). They all may follow slightly different selling structures. But call them what you want. If they are bringing in new profitable clients, then you love them.

I?ve talked with many young, growing firms who manage an international distributor program as a way to quickly expand into new international markets. There is a strong case to be made for this approach. The costs are low – much lower than setting up a local subsidiary, hiring staff, making local connections and managing local compliance and tax regulations. Distributors already have local network connections. They know how to sell into their local market. It can be a great early-stage market entry approach to help rapidly expand your company?s global footprint.

Now that was the Disneyland Version of international partners. For most companies, their distributor outcomes are more mixed with some partners performing beyond expectations, others selling literally nothing, and some requiring high levels of staff support that eat through any profits they may have produced. While I cannot guarantee your success with all partners, here is my advice to improve your partner success rate:

1. Proactively recruit your international representatives.?

Once a company signals that they are doing business internationally, foreign agents of many types will want to be your exclusive distributor to their home country or region. But just because a Brazilian agent approaches you does not mean that they are qualified, connected or otherwise the best representation available.

It make take a little more work upfront, but it is definitely worth the time and energy to proactively seek out Brazilian rep options. Then it is just as important to properly vet these potential partners for their reputation, connections, legal standing, etc. As I’m sure you all know from your own experiences,?partner turnover is costly.

 

2. Develop a close relationship with your partners.

This may sound counterintuitive to some. After all, the less time spent with a rep means less support costs. But that?s the Accountant?s Approach to international expansion and a self defeating one at that. Strong channels mean much higher sales potential, which normally outweigh the costs by many fold.

Instead, try to arrange to visit each rep at least once a year in their home market. This will set you apart from the majority of other companies your distributor represents. A rep likely represents a few dozen to a few hundred products. You want to make sure that your products are top of mind when he or she is talking with potential clients.

It also helps greatly if your business relationship with a rep grows in complexity and integration between your companies. If the relationship is basic and remote, then when either side falls on tough times or the first sign of challenges, they will leave the arrangement. It is much better to have reasons to stay and strengthen your channels.

 

3. Work together to decide on the right in-country messaging and supporting materials.
International representatives have every reason to help you figure out the best way to communicate with local potential buyers. It is not unusual for buying and selling patterns to shift significantly from market to market.

The place to start is with your company?s current marketing assets. What can be used without any alterations? Is there anything that can be easily created by you or your country rep to suit their selling process? It may be something as simple as a localized phone script or a few slides changed in the sales slide deck. Try to keep any localization changes simple at this stage and plan for more involved marketing if your company eventually sets up a foreign subsidiary.

 

4. Find individual (and group) motivational tools.
As business leaders, we already know that our employees are each motivated by different triggers. Joe, your customer service manager, ?may want an extra week of vacation time instead of its equivalent cash bonus OR he may prefer a paid executive coach to mentor his career as reward for professional success. Partner-specific motivation?is an area of channel management where creativity pays off.

You may have two competing distributors – one in Sydney and the other in Melbourne – who have a cultivated rivalry. Buy an obnoxiously large trophy and offer the trophy plus bragging rights to the distributor who sells the most of your products by the end of the fiscal year.

Your rep may be motivated by title promotion. Honestly, I would call a rep a Chief Selling Officer of Thailand if they doubled their Thai sales this year. It?s relatively easy to change and costs nothing. This may be useful in combination with other incentives.

Sales departments have been using the ?President?s Club? motivator for years. Those who exceed quota are invited often with spouses to a luxury trip paid for by the company. There may be some creative version of this concept that could work for high performance channel partners.

 

Regardless of your approaches to building your international selling team, I hope that you find some of these ideas useful. It?s best to just keep an open mind and an eye towards creative solutions. A strong network of international sales will help propel your company towards greater growth and profitability.

 

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