Ding Zhengli

Ding Zhengli

Today I have the privilege of interviewing Chinese business consultants, Ding Zhengli and Tan Xiaoran, who both studied in the United States and now add a cultural bridge to companies looking to expand business in China. Mr. Ding and Mr. Tan are a Principles of Global Progressive Solutions, a firm focused on global business strategy with particular concentration on entering and succeeding in the Chinese market.

The International Entrepreneur (TIE): Zhengli and Xiaoran, you have spent time in both American and Chinese business cultures. Do you have any recommendations for American and British professionals looking to better understand the Chinese market?

Zhengli: For this question, I’d say make some Chinese friends. I think this is the easiest way to get a fast access to know Chinese culture. Knowing a Chinese in real world will bring direct feelings and experience to American and British professionals. But in the real business, it won’t be enough time to find a good Chinese friend. I think western professionals should have a mentor for their Chinese market. The mentor should have deep understanding at both western culture and Chinese culture. And always be aware of your Chinese partners, employees and customers. As a collective culture like China, group harmony is a great deal for projects, assignments, companies and business. Treating people like family and friends would build the relationship faster and longer.

Tan Xiaoran

Tan Xiaoran

Xiaoran: I think doing business in China is not only about business. A deal is not just a deal. There are many social activities will be involved in all processes, such as tourist visits, dinners, night events and leisure activities. Chinese believe they are doing business with people have their own personality. Such social activities can help Chinese learn about the people’s personality they’re dealing with. Participating social activities can help build strong relationship and gain trust from each other.  So be prepared for long conversation about family, sports, political topics or any other non-business things.

TIE: What are some fundamental ways that marketing a B2B product in China would differ from how we would approach this process in the UK or US?

Zhengli: I think this depends on the type of products. If it’s a manufactured product, online clients like Alibaba would be a good choice. These kinds of clients have built a great brand image as having all kind of products online. It’s easy to find selected products on those websites. But one thing should be aware of is bargaining. Even a product is listed on the website, a customer could possibly bargain about the price if they think their bottom line is reasonable. Negotiation skills are really important here. If a foreign company is selling something, the customer will be satisfied if they can bargain the price lower.

If the product less tangible (ex. software), create a detailed “white book” in Chinese. But the real deal should always have personal contacts such as phone calls or visits even the customer has already paid. Those personal contacts can give customers a feeling that they are really important and they are dealing with humans, not companies.

Also, in B2B marketing and sales, be aware of titles. Always do a title match before meetings and calls. You don’t want your middle level managers talking to a company’s CEO, at least a top guy from a related department. And say sorry for your boss to the other party if he cannot attend, so they do not lose face.

TIE: Many companies are trying to save costs and effort by directly translating their company website to simplified Chinese. From your perspective, what kind of potential (if any) is lost by not localizing?

Xiaoran: I think it still depends on what kind of business. Industries selling products such like equipment, pharmaceuticals or other real existing goods, directly translating their company website would not be a bad idea. Customers who need these kinds of products make their decision based more on products’ quality and price. Those companies could also use B2B websites such as Alibaba to reduce their risks of a bad translation. They only need to be careful about their product’s name in Chinese – it might have a different meaning.

For companies with low brand recognition in China, directly translating website would not help their business in China at all. Chinese customers prefer to know someone in the company or know the company first, and then they take detailed look at websites when they are looking for services. Certificates and prizes would help companies on attracting customers, but most U.S or UK companies don’t highlight those on the website. Most Chinese, especially middle-age people don’t treat online searching as a way to look for partners or business opportunities in service industries. Chinese are more willing to talk with you face to face or on-line, rather than just sending messages or emails. This is the way Chinese building trust with their partners or customers. So the website needs to support building trust through more direct channels. And for sure, you need a localized website for your service in Chinese and has every detail about your service, your company’s professional experience/rewards, and your special deals! Remember, Chinese love a great deal.

 

About Ding Zhengli and Tan Xiaoran

Born and raised in Hubei, China, Ding Zhengli is Chinese national with a highly diverse background.  Zhengli attended Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, receiving a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering.  After graduating from Huazhong University, Zhengli came to the United States to earn his Master of Science in International Business at the University of Colorado Denver.  After living in the United States for more than 3 years, Zhengli became one of the founding partners of Global Progressive Solutions (GPS).  He is a skilled consultant concerning U.S. companies wanting to operate in China.

Tan Xiaoran was born and raised in Changchun, Jilin Province of China. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting. Xiaoran has been living in USA for more than 3 years, and received his Master’s Degree of Economics from The University of Colorado Denver. Due to his extensive experience in Chinese banking and politics, Xiaoran has developed deep knowledge of building relationships and dealing with businessmen in China. He also has strong connections in northeast region of China.

Contact Ding Zhengli and Tan Xiaoran: [email protected]globalprogressivesolutions.net

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